World Borders: How to Get From Kazakhstan to Kyrgyzstan (Almaty to Bishkek by Marshrutky)

World Borders: How to Get From Kazakhstan to Kyrgyzstan (Almaty to Bishkek by Marshrutky)

World Borders: How to Get From Kazakhstan to Kyrgyzstan (Almaty to Bishkek by Marshrutky)

Before I decided on doing the border crossing between Kazakhstan to Kyrgyzstan, I did a bit of research into it. The reason being, I was travelling alone, it was my first time in this region, I’m without a guide book and I wanted to make sure everything ran smoothly. In the winter time in the Stans, you also have to make the most of daylight as it gets dark early and slippy roads also cause huge delays. My plan therefore was to go direct from my hostel in Almaty (Almaty Backpackers) to the Apple Hostel in Bishkek while it was daylight.

Sayran Bus Station, Almaty, Kazakhstan

Sayran Bus Station, Almaty, Kazakhstan

Getting to Sayran Bus Station in Almaty
I started the day in Almaty Backpackers with a great bit of breakfast around 9 am and then had a bit of typing and writing to compile before I left. I would normally just get a bus, but I was running a tad late at 10 am so I decided to get a taxi from my hostel straight to the bus station. Buses in Almaty are so much cheaper by the way (80 Tenge per journey) but they are slow and make a lot of stops.

On the local buses in Almaty, Kazakhstan

On the local buses in Almaty, Kazakhstan

My taxi was sorted and I said a fond farewell to the Almaty Backpackers and straight into my taxi to meet my taxi driver called Kanat. When I got in, I had been busy on the laptop and wasn’t focused so I told him to take me to the bus station. Of course, this is when the confusion began…Almaty is a huge city consisting of 1.5 million people and therefore has more than one bus station. I remembered the name of the bus station was pronounced “Sigh something”. So on my map there was what I thought was the bus station I needed – Sayakhat!

In the taxi with Kanat

In the taxi with Kanat

But I was wrong, it was the other bus station in the city beginning with Say – it was Sayran that I needed to get to!! After a frantic discussion about it, it became clear that Kanat and I now understood each other and started heading to Sayran. The onyl downside was it would cost a bit more. Originally I thought a taxi would be 550 Tenge ($1.5 US), but it would now be 1000 Tenge ($3 US). Given that I felt I was running late and that Kanat was a good driver who spoke English, I was happy to pay him $3 US for the lift. By bargaining and speaking Russian I am sure you could get it cheaper.

Driving through Almaty by taxi

Driving through Almaty by taxi

Arrival at Sayran bus station

Arrival at Sayran bus station

Leaving Sayran Bus Station in Almaty, Kazakhstan
Having travelled on Marshrutky quite a few times down the years, I know what to expect from them. They are usually cheap and cheerful, cosy and usage is clear. When you get to Sayran station, make sure you head to the main bus station/marshrutky area for long distance marshrutky. It’s the big building that you can’t miss. If you are getting a taxi there like I did, you will probably be dropped off with the bus station on your right hand side.

Almaty Sayran bus station

Almaty Sayran bus station

Go into the main bus station and look for platform 1 on the far right. This should be the bus to Bishkek. Nothing will be written in English of course, but the writing for Bishkek looks like this, the words below are the local and Russian alphabet was of saying Bishkek: TOKMOK

Platform 1 for Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

Platform 1 for Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

Platform 1 for Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

Platform 1 for Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

Platform 1 for Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

Platform 1 for Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

There are toilets in the station if you need to go, there is a cafe and there are vendors selling drinks and snacks. Everything is relatively cheap and you do not have to watch about being ripped of. There are also currency exchange kiosks in the station so you can change Tenge for the Kyrgyzstani Som, it was about 4 Tenge to 1 Som when I went.

My Marshrutka to Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

My Marshrutka to Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

I got the last of my Kazakstani Tenge changed, you don’t really have to have Kyrgyzstani Som in advance, but I had heard horror reports of backpackers being left at the border unable to hitch-hike, so it seemed the best option for me to have them just in case.

Kyrgyzstani Som

Kyrgyzstani Som

Once you find platform 1 and the correct Marshrutka, you can drop off your backpack into the boot of the mini-bus. My Marshrutka was white and said Bishkek clearly on the front of it. It was half-full when I got there. If you know the craic with Marshrutky, you will know that no tickets are issued and you just pay up front and they leave when full. This one is no exception. I paid 1,300 Tenge (about $4 US dollars) and this price takes you all the way to Bishkek. Remember that.

My bus bound for Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan from Almaty, Kazakhstan

My bus bound for Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan from Almaty, Kazakhstan

This means Bishkek

This means Bishkek

I got to Sayran Bus Station by 10.30 am and our Marshrutka left, full at 11 am. It was now onwards to the border to Kyrgyzstan.

Inside the Marshrutka bound for Kyrgyzstan

Inside the Marshrutka bound for Kyrgyzstan

Almaty to Korday, Kazakhstan
The journey I made was in late December so it was snowy on the ground and sunny outside. The view of the mountains was magnificent, though I also grabbed some sleep. We headed west out of Almaty, keeping the mountains to our left all the way and at 1 pm we had our first passport check, some 25 minutes before arriving at the town of Korday, which is by the border.

Views between Almaty and Korday

Views between Almaty and Korday

Views between Almaty and Korday

Views between Almaty and Korday

It took roughly two and a half hours to get to the actual exit point from Kazakhstan.

This was where we had the first passport check

This was where we had the first passport check

Leaving Kazakhstan at Korday
When we arrive at the border town of Korday, we are all ushered out of the Marshrutka. I had heard stories before about other travellers being left behind, and that you shouldn’t exit the mini-bus. Those stories seemed like a nonsense to me, the driver was very friendly and understood what I was saying to him. We all get out and the driver tells me that a different Marshrutka will be waiting once we have passed through both immigration sides of the border. I believe him, he’s a good lad (and later we find, he’s true to his word).

Looking back to the town of Korday in Kazakhstan

Looking back to the town of Korday in Kazakhstan

Basically the reason you take your bags out of the Marshrutka is because they have to be scanned on exiting Kazakhstan. I head straight through to the immigration exit point for Kazakhstan. It’s pretty bunged full and busy. It’s around 1.35 pm. I didn’t need a visa for Kazakhstan on my British Passport (would have needed one on my Irish), so it was a simple exit for me.

Leaving Kazakhstan at

Leaving Kazakhstan at Korday

But also, get talking to other people in your Marshrutka, as I did. Join the immigration queue with them, go through with them, this way you can be sure you are not being left behind – they need to get to Bishkek too don’t forget. Leaving Kazakhstan, the guy checked my passport (a British passport) and proceeded to stamp me out of the country. He didn’t ask me any questions, not even if I needed a visa for Kyrgyzstan (EU citizens didn’t in December 2015).

My exit stamp for Kazakhstan

My exit stamp for Kazakhstan

The border itself is picturesque and magnificent, over a small river. Photos are not allowed inside the units, but I could take a few here, at the bridge. The entire walk across the border is down a fenced in path. A beautiful walk.

The river separating Kazakhstan from Kyrgyzstan

The river separating Kazakhstan from Kyrgyzstan

Walking across the border from Kazakhstan to Kyrgyzstan

Walking across the border from Kazakhstan to Kyrgyzstan

Sign and flag on arrival in Kyrgyzstan

Sign and flag on arrival in Kyrgyzstan

Arrival in Kyrgyzstan near Konstantinova
When I arrive in Kyrgyzstan, there are two separate parts to go through. The first one is a door on the left which is where non-Stan passport holders must go. The other one is a place to check the passport/stamp is valid. So basically foreigners have to go to two places on the way into the country and locals (and those who have close bonds to Kyrgyzstan, like Kazakhstan and Tajikistan) have one. As of December 2015, holders of EU passports do not need a visa to enter Kyrgyzstan either by air or by land borders. So it’s a good time to go!

Arrival on the Kyrgyzstan side of the border

Arrival on the Kyrgyzstan side of the border

At the first check, a police officer opens a door on the left, looks at my passport “Irlandia” he says, I reply “yes”, he stamps it with two stamps and gives me 60 days in the country. He is polite.

My double stamp - the Kyrgyzstan entry stamp

My double stamp – the Kyrgyzstan entry stamp

While he is stamping my passport, I meet a girl who lives in Darwin, Australia. However she is originally from Kyrgyzstan and has dual nationality and is with her husband. She asks if I wanted a taxi share to Bishkek and I said I’d stick with her just in case my Marshrutka didn’t show up.

Arrival on the Kyrgyzstan side of the border

Arrival on the Kyrgyzstan side of the border

On the Kyrgyzstan side of the border, there is no bag check. The second lady who checks my passport, smiles, welcomes me and I’m in. Country 108 on my journey. I walk past the next gate and notice two people who were on my Marshrutka from Almaty, Kazakhstan. I ask them (in English) if they are waiting to go to Bishkek. They understand and nod and we wait. I signal to the Australian lady that I am OK to get to Bishkek now.

Looking back at the border where I came in.

Looking back at the border where I came in.

Waiting for the connecting Marshrutka

Waiting for the connecting Marshrutka

The border entry point to Kyrgyzstan is near a town called Konstantinova, though we do not see or pass through the town. The border point where we arrive has a restaurant and a money exchange place.

Money exchange

Money exchange

My connecting Marshrutky arrives

My connecting Marshrutky arrives

A restaurant at the border (Kyrgyzstan side)

A restaurant at the border (Kyrgyzstan side)

Within 15 minutes, my Marshrutka has arrived, we bung our bags in and off we go. I talk to two local lads at the back to confirm this mini-bus is going to the WEST bus station in Bishkek as advertised and they tell me it is. We have a good chat, take some happy selfies and in less than half an hour we arrive at the West Bus Station in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan.

Marshrutky to Bishkek from the border.

Marshrutky to Bishkek from the border.

Selfies with my bus mates (yes, I've tried turning the photo round)

Selfies with my bus mates (yes, I’ve tried turning the photo round)

The entire crossing was smooth and easy and I walked to my hostel, the Apple Hostel Bishkek within 5 minutes where I am welcomed by the lovely Aigul. It was around 3.20 pm, which means the entire journey took me around 5 hours 20 minutes, hostel to hostel. Pretty good!

Arrival at Bishkek West bus station

Arrival at Bishkek West bus station

Arrival at Bishkek West bus station

Arrival at Bishkek West bus station

Arrival the the Apple Hostel Bishkek

Arrival the the Apple Hostel Bishkek

Safe travels everyone, hope this helps you out on the same route! Bishkek is a great place to get visas for Tajikistan, Gorno Badakhshan, Uzbekistan and Afghanistan.

Here are some of my videos from the border crossing:

Join 15,017 Monthly Readers! If you enjoyed this article and LOVE travel and SAVING money, get e-mail updates from Don’t Stop Living – a lifestyle of travel! (It’s Free) 😉 Jonny

28 thoughts on “World Borders: How to Get From Kazakhstan to Kyrgyzstan (Almaty to Bishkek by Marshrutky)

  • Hey Jonny;
    I am thinking about going to Azerbaijan (i have been there already and loved it), then to Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. What is there to do during the summer?
    Would it be safe to travel there as an American?
    What is there to see and do?
    Thanks,
    AlanLouganis@yahoo.com

  • Hi Alan, thanks for the comment. I haven’t been updating this website recently as I have severe depression. But of course they are VERY safe countries!! Check my tabs on what you can do there – hiking, backpacking, eating, horse riding, sightseeing – lots to do and a great region. Check my posts on them – safe travels. Jonny

  • Hi Jonny

    Presumably at the Kyrgyz/Kazakh crossing you get out yourself and the driver doesn’t collect passports??

  • Hi Eimeara, thanks for the comment. Yes of course, you walk through each border check with your bags and passports and the driver of the bus should be waiting on the other side once you have everything sorted. Safe travels. Jonny

  • Thanks Jonny for your reply and help. I had some very bad experiences with my passport where the guide collected passports and tickets . Originally i thought it was for the hotel but when i went to reception the following day to get it they couldn’t find it and the group leader came up behind and said he had it. It’s politeness to ask people if they want this. Also another occasion I gave it to the hotel for safe keeping and it walked to the group leader.
    Only the holder should hand it in /present it is my rule.
    Also this practice at some borders such as South America of drivers collecting passports is not acceptable. What if they lost it? Or refused to give it back? Then you are in a pickle and can’t comply with a countries laws.

  • Hey Jonny,

    Excellent writeup.

    Which month is it when you traveled to Bishkek? Looks pretty cold.

    Thanks
    Sandeep

  • Hi Sandeep I travelled there in December 2015, and stayed until April 2016. I guess it was cold for some of that period but not too long. Safe travels. Jonny

  • Hi Eimeara thanks for your comment, but on your travels, NEVER give your passport to someone else unless you really trust them. I normally only give it to close friends and family, police that are DEFINITELY stamping them and those in Embassies who I believe will give me a visa. Safe travels. Jonny

  • Hi Jonny, thanks for your write-up – very useful as I will be doing this trip in a few weeks time. I’m just going to stay in Bishkek for one night as I only have 8 days in Almaty. But will I have any problem getting back into Kazakhstan the next day – do they just give you a new 30 day stamp at the border? (I’m a UK citizen)
    Thanks- Mike

  • Hi Mike, Thanks for the comment. I was able to stay in Kazakhstan in 2015 for 14 days with a stamp at the border. I was able to stay in Kyrgyzstan in 2015- 2016 for 90 days with a stamp at the border. I have Irish and British passports and don’t remember exactly which ones I used each time. I had three trips to Kyrgyzstan and 2 trips to Kazakstan and it was not a problem at all, so I hope you will be fine. I hope it has stayed the same for you now in 2017. Uzbekistan, Afghanistan, Karakalpakstan, Gorno Badakhshan and Tajikistan were all MUCH more strict one me, the biggest nightmare was Uzbekistan, you’ll need a visa in advance for all of those places (though the Uzbek one covers Karakalpakstan, but the Tajik one doesn’t cover Gorno). Safe travels. Jonny

  • Just crossed Kyrgzystan border into Kazaghstan last night, apparently they just told me to queue with the locals with passport and thats about it, im not sure if things have changed but everything was smooth.

  • Hi Jonny, did you spoke Russian to the people? Thanks for the article, it’s a great help!

  • This year of May, I traveled with opposite direction of you to Kazakhstan from Kyrgyzstan, when I left Kyrgyzstan border is no problem, but Kazakhstan immigration officer indicated my passport has a wrong stamp of Kyrgyzstan(I entry from China by land), he proposed to deny me of entry and asked me: Would you have another prove of citizenship? I given him my Hong Kong identity card, and he asked me Which document you entry China? I presented my home return permit. When I waiting a result I am very worry I may be detained. Finally, about one hour later, he allowed to entry and stamped in twice on migration card. It is a nightmare for me of border crossing.

  • Hi Yinron, thanks for the comment and sorry for the delay. I am getting round to reading and reply to about 1,500 comments now. That sounds like an ordeal at the border, I hope it all worked okay in the end. I had many troubles myself on borders and with visas. Stay safe. Jonny

  • Wonderful explanation Jonny. Last summer 2019, I rented in Bishkek at Iron Nomad (excellent company), then drove to Tu Ashuu pass thru Issyk Kul to Burana towers and then to Cholpon Ata to Karakol and into Kazakhstan thru Karaka Bodrer. On way to Almaty visited Saty (Kaindy Lake) and Charyn Park. It was an excellent drive. Only drawback is the Police in Kyrgyzstan. YIKES!! They try to siphon off as much as possible starting with 6000 SOM before negotiating down to 1000 SOM. Almost every policeman wants a cut. The border crossing at Karakara was a breeze except for a small incident on Kyrgyz side. One officer told me to park a little ahead and when I did that another officer came and said I violated and wanted 50000 SOM..LOL..I said i aint paying a dime. Me being Indian, was greeted by I AM A DISCO DANCER song on Kazakh side!!!

  • Hi Phani, Thanks for the comment. Yes it was a wacaday crazy trip from Kazakhstan into Kyrgyzstan but it was in 2015, things might have changed. I am glad it worked out okay in the end. Stay safe. Jonny

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