World Borders: How to get from Turkey to Iran (Gurbulak to Bazargan)

turkey iran border

World Borders: How to get from Turkey to Iran.

As far as world borders go, this one from Iran to Turkey overland is one of the fastest and easiest believe it or not. In fact, I was a bit surprised by the simplicity of it. If you’re heading overland from Gurbulak to Bazargan, here’s a guide on how to get from Turkey to Iran. Don’t forget you might need an Authorisation Code for Iran and for sure a Visa for Iran first though (check my links).

dogubayazit turkey iran border

The Turkish town of Dogubayazit.

Leaving Dogubayazit, Turkey

Most travellers heading to Iran overland will either be based in, or pass through Dogubayazit. If you have time on your hands, it’s worth spending a night here. Cheap food, a load of hotels, an off the beaten track spot and an awesome hillside palace. I wrote about my visit to Ishak Pasha Palace. We spent a night in Dogubayazit then got up early doors to head to Iran.

dogubayazit turkey

Downtown Dogubayazit – we stayed a night here on route to Iran.

Mini-bus from Dogubayazit to Gurbulak

In downtown Dogubayazit, head to the corner where Agri Cadessi meets Rifki Baskaya Caddesi. There’s a massive mini-bus depot there and opposite that a petrol station, then opposite the petrol station on the main road to Iran (Agri Cadessi) there’s a small office which advertises mini-buses to Gurbulak. The mini-buses leave when they’re full, or when the driver wants.

dogubayazit to gurbulak bus

Boarding the mini bus in Dogubayazit heading to Gurbulak.

In November 2013 we paid 7 Turkish Lira per person for the ride. We were the only foreigners on our mini-bus. The ride took around half an hour only.

dogubayazit to gurbulak

On the bus from Dogubayazit to Gurbulak at the Turkey to Iran border.

how to get from turkey to iran overland

Panny and I on the bus from Dogubayazit to Gurbulak at the Turkey to Iran border.

Pretty scenic on route, a few scattered old ruins, a few army trucks and we arrived at Gurbulak. It’s 35 kilometres from Dogubayazit to Gurbulak. You pay for the mini-bus when you get off at the border.

gurbulak to iran border

The road from Dogubayazit to Gurbulak in Turkey, on route to Iran.

Leaving Turkey at Gurbulak

This is easy and straight forward. Once you get off the mini-bus you see the border in front of you. The entrance gate is the same for vehicles and pedestrians, so just walk on through. There’s a load of Turkish flags above the entrance. They don’t check your passport at the entrance gate. There may be Turkish guys that follow you asking if you want to change money. Politely ignore them and keep walking toward the border.

gurbulak turkey to iran border

At Gurbulak ready to leave Turkey.

The left hand side is for Heavy Goods Vehicles and Juggernauts, the right hand side is for the pedestrians so stay right. After a few hundred metres you’ll see the border in front of you.

turkey iran border bazargan

The Turkey and Iran flags at the Gurbulak to Bazargan border.

Turkish flags fly and in behind is a large Iran flag and two photos of Iranians. On the left is the duty free shop. This is where you go to get your Turkey exit stamp.

gurbulak bazargan border

The Turkey side looking into Iran from Gurbulak to Bazargan.

You walk in, up to the turnstile and hand your passport in to the guy behind the window. He’ll check your Turkish visa and Iran visa and that’s it. He will then stamp you out of Turkey. You’ve now left Turkey. There was no queue when we went and the entire process was over in a few minutes.

gurbulak turkey stamp

My stamp for leaving Turkey at Gurbulak.

Then you pass the Duty Free Shop on your right, which was a tad baffling to see, as alcohol is forbidden in Iran, so realistically they won’t sell much booze here, perhaps it’s used by people coming the other way.

turkey border gurbulak

The Turkey border exit point at Gurbulak.

After that you head outside where you see a fenced pathway which leads to Iran.

iran border turkey

The fenced pathway that leads to Iran.

Arrival into Iran at Bazargan

Head along the fenced pathway and there’s a sign for Iran, It’s literally only 20 metres to the Iran hut. At the entrance to the building, a guy will simply check your Turkish exit stamp on your passport. He didn’t even look at the Iran Visa page.

bazargan entry stamp

My stamp for entering Iran at Bazargan.

Then you come to the immigration section and entry to Iran. The guy working there will check your visa, ask you a few questions and stamp you in. This was ridiculously fast, friendly and efficient. His colleague came over and asked me what I work at, what parts of Iran we want to see (I said Tabriz, Shiraz, Isfahan and Tehran) and how we plan to leave (we said we are not sure yet – probably overland to Turkey).

bazargan iran arrival

Successful arrival into Iran at Bazargan.

After that, he led me through the entrance and I was in Iran. No bag check, no forms to fill out. All hassle free and friendly.

bazargan border bus

We got the minibus from the border point to the centre of Bazargan.

Onward Transport in Bazargan

We got a mini-bus which we ended up not paying for as the kind Iranians on board paid for us! I don’t recommend getting a taxi from the border as they will try to rip you off. Get the mini-bus into Bazargan and then a taxi if you need to.

bazargan minibus border

These two cool guys paid for our minibus into Bazargan.

Time Difference Turkey to Iran 

Move your watch forward one hour thirty minutes when you arrive in Iran. It’s a vast country as you’ll discover – we used 29 days of our 30 day visa and saw a hell of a lot of it – if you have the time – please linger longer – you will LOVE Iran.

One thing to note is that there is no bag search on either side. I don’t recommend bringing alcohol into Iran, as I respect their culture, but for sure it’s something you could do without anyone finding out. Please note – I don’t recommend this, unlike in Brunei where I signed a declaration and brought my own alcohol in.

iran visa love it

Loving our month in Iran: Qazvin Bazaar.

You’re now in Iran folks – enjoy!!

Here are my videos of the journey from Gurbulak to Bazargan:

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About Jonny Blair

I'm Jonny Blair, a travelling Northern Irishman. Since leaving my hometown a decade ago I have managed to visit over 100 countries and over 600 towns or cities across all 7 continents. Along the way I have worked in countless jobs! Join my journey on Don't Stop Living - a lifestyle of travel as I provide you with tips and inspiration to live your travel dreams! Safe travels! Follow me on Jonny Blair Google Plus
This entry was posted in Bazargan, Central Asia/Middle East, Dogubayazit, Gurbulak, Iran, Turkey, World Borders, X tips. Bookmark the permalink.

17 Responses to World Borders: How to get from Turkey to Iran (Gurbulak to Bazargan)

  1. Hi Jonny, I’m quite surprised how straight forward this was. I hope you had a great time in Iran! Where are you these days?
    Pedro @ Travel with Pedro recently posted…7 of My Best Travel Experiences in 2013My Profile

  2. Jonny Blair says:

    Hi Pedro – Yes – an easy border and Iran is a great country to visit. I’m in Liverpool in England today, then backpacking my way down to the south coast before flying to either Chengdu or Bangkok! Safe travels, Jony

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  4. Mary says:

    Where did you change money once you got to Bazargan? I’ll be doing this journey in a week’s time. Need advice on changing money at border or in town. Thanks. Great pics et al.

  5. Jonny Blair says:

    Hi Mary – Thanks for the comment – we only changed a VERY small amount in Bazargan from a local lad hanging around the border point – just try to avoid the guys that follow you at the Turkish border exit and the guys that first aproach you in Bazargan – walk outside and you’ll get a better rate. That money was enough to get us to Tabriz, where we changed the rest. We found Tabriz and Mashhad to be the cheapest places in Iran to change the money. We spent a month there. It’s a great country – you will LOVE IT. Safe travels. Jonny

  6. Henry Fung says:

    Hey Jonny,

    Thanks for the useful post! I am wondering how you travelled from barzagan to Tabriz? Thanks in advance

  7. Jonny Blair says:

    I got a bus from Maku to Tabriz after a short taxi from Bazargan to Maku. They run every day, but the last one is around 4pm I think. This was in December last year! Safe travels. Jonny

  8. Henry says:

    Thanks!

  9. henry says:

    Hi jonny,
    I am wondering if theres a direct bus from trabzon to dogubayazit? If so, what is the name of the company, as I cant seem to find it online. It would be great if u can tell me soon as I am leaving tmr for trabzon!

    Thanks!

  10. Jonny Blair says:

    Hi Henry, I think there might be one that goes direct actually but they don’t really have websites, nor can I remember the company name. Just head to central Trabzon and near the Ataturk statue, just up the hill there are a load of bus companies – walk in and ask them all. We went Trabzon – Agri had a one hour wait in Agri then a bus to Dogubayzit. good luck. Jonny

  11. henry says:

    Thanks jonny! You are a lifesaver

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  14. Peiman says:

    That’s wonderful how you get to iran safely! Is there any mini-bus from Dugobaizit to main city Agri??

  15. Jonny Blair says:

    Hi Peiman, yes it’s a very safe and easy border crossing. Yes there are regular buses and minibuses between Agre and Dogubayazit. Safe and happy travels. Jonny

  16. Nikolaus Barabas says:

    Can you also cross the border between Turkey and the Iran by car? That would also be an interesting experience.

  17. Jonny Blair says:

    Ni Nikolaus, thanks for the comment. Of course you can – we met plenty of others going by bus, car, train and even by flight. But as overland backpackers, we preferred a mini bus to the border, walk across the border and then backpack it to the next town. Safe travels. Jonny

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